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Why are Harbeth speakers not rear ported?

tIANcI

Member
I realized that, other than the P3 (in all its variants) that is a sealed speaker, all the speakers in the Harbeth range are front ported. Why is that when almost 90% of speakers with ports are all rear ported.

What, in layman’s terms, is the difference between rear and front ported speakers?
 

A.S.

Harbeth UK
Staff member
I wish I knew.

You do have to wonder if placing the port behind the speaker is a great idea, when the high pressure airflow from the port will set the rear wall into motion.
 

chrisj1948

New member
A.S. said:
You do have to wonder if placing the port behind the speaker is a great idea, when the high pressure airflow from the port will set the rear wall into motion.
My immediate thought when I read your post was of a rear ported speaker playing in a tent!
 

BAS-H

Member
Perhaps also when there's no accessible space on the front baffle? Still seems totally undesirable to me
 

tIANcI

Member
Not exciting the front wall is true ... maybe many manufacturers do it to get better readings in their measurements for marketing purposes?

Heretic said:
There was an interesting discussion on it at gearslutz.com a few years back and i'm kinda in agreement that when ported designs are not so well executed and gives rise to port turbulence, placing them rear firing can help mask such (unwanted) audible effects.

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/so-much-gear-so-little-time/1008710-does-port-placement-actually-matter.html
Port turbulence ... it’s interesting. I have a pair of ProAc Response D2, it has a front port. I did read quite a few people who commented on forums that they hear the port turbulence. I been playing music with strong bass (low bass, mid bass) through it and I don’t hear any chuffing/fluffing/flapping sound. Makes me wonder if there is really turbulence or it’s all in their mind.
 

allthumbs

Member
I always thought that the rear bass reflex port was a way of using the wall behind the speaker to add bass and that could be somewhat fine tuned by moving the speaker to a distance where balance was maintained but the added bass retained?

Could the 30.2's and its sound signaturen the same quality and level of bass that it has in its reflex ported version in a sealed enclosure if the enclosure was larger? Are decisions about using a reflex port also based on other concerns, aesthetic as well as material costs, ease of production, driver size etc? Or is it simply the best acoustic engineering solution, does it make things any easier with driver integration etc etc.?
 

BAS-H

Member
I believe the broad answer to that, is that provided there is sufficient space on the baffle for a port, there is no reason not to have it. The ported bass reflex system allows for deeper bass extension, while at the same time, lessening the physical movement of the driver. This extends the life of the driver, and because it moves less, inherently improves linearity. Speaker efficiency also improves with the bass reflex system, lessening amplifier power required.
 
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